University of Adelaide Library

Adelaide Research and Scholarship : Schools and Disciplines : School of Population Health & Clinical Practice : Public Health : Public Health publications

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/73969

Type: Journal article
Title: Traumatic events, other operational stressors and physical and mental health reported by Australian Defence Force personnel following peacekeeping and war-like deployments
Author: Waller, M.
Treloar, S.
Sim, M.
McFarlane, A.
McGuire, A.
Bleier, J.
Dobson, A.
Citation: BMC Psychiatry, 2012; 12:1-11
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd.
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 1471-244X
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Michael Waller, Susan A Treloar, Malcolm R Sim, Alexander C McFarlane, Annabel C L McGuire, Jonathan Bleier and Annette J Dobson
Abstract: Background: The association between stressful events on warlike deployments and subsequent mental health problems has been established. Less is known about the effects of stressful events on peacekeeping deployments. Methods: Two cross sectional studies of the Australian Defence Force were used to contrast the prevalence of exposures reported by a group deployed on a peacekeeping operation (Bougainville, n=1704) and those reported by a group deployed on operations which included warlike and non-warlike exposures (East Timor, n=1333). A principal components analysis was used to identify groupings of non-traumatic exposures on deployment. Multiple regression models were used to assess the association between self-reported objective and subjective exposures, stressors on deployment and subsequent physical and mental health outcomes. Results: The principal components analysis produced four groups of non-traumatic stressors which were consistent between the peacekeeping and more warlike deployments. These were labelled ‘separation’, ‘different culture’, ‘other people’ and ‘work frustration’. Higher levels of traumatic and non-traumatic exposures were reported by veterans of East Timor compared to Bougainville. Higher levels of subjective traumatic exposures were associated with increased rates of PTSD in East Timor veterans and more physical and psychological health symptoms in both deployed groups. In Bougainville and East Timor veterans some non-traumatic deployment stressors were also associated with worse health outcomes. Conclusion: Strategies to best prepare, identify and treat those exposed to traumatic events and other stressors on deployment should be considered for Defence personnel deployed on both warlike and peacekeeping operations.
Rights: © 2012 Waller et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
RMID: 0020121698
DOI: 10.1186/1471-244X-12-88
Published version: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-244X/12/88
Appears in Collections:Public Health publications
View citing articles in: Web of Science
Google Scholar
Scopus

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
hdl_73969.pdfPublished version192.17 kBAdobe PDFView/Open

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

© 2008 The University of Adelaide
library@adelaide.edu.au
CRICOS Provider Number 00123M
Service Charter | Copyright | Privacy | Disclaimer