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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/74437

Type: Journal article
Title: Restless legs syndrome in patients with depressive disorders
Author: Happe, S.
Baune, Bernhard Theodor
Lanz, M.
Berger, Klaus
Hornyak, M.
Citation: Somnologie, 2012; 16(3):183-188
Publisher: Springer
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 1432-9123
School/Discipline: School of Medicine : Psychiatry
Statement of
Responsibility: 
S. Happe, B.T. Baune, M. Lanz, K. Berger and M. Hornyak
Abstract: AIM: Recent community-based studies have shown strong associations between restless legs syndrome (RLS) and major depressive disorder and panic disorder. The aim of the study was to investigate whether patients with a manifest depressive disorder have an increased prevalence of RLS and whether there is an association with different depressive disorders. METHODS: Three psychiatry departments in two countries (Germany and Australia) each recruited 100 consecutive patients with current depression. All patients completed a standardized questionnaire including diagnostic questions for RLS, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the International RLS Severity Scale (IRLS), if RLS was present. The treating doctors completed a second standardized questionnaire including RLS diagnostic questions and comorbidities. RESULTS: A total of 277 questionnaires could be evaluated, 184 in Germany (96 in Bremen, 88 in Freiburg) and 93 in Australia. The Australian patients were younger than the German patients (45.4 ± 13.8 vs. 49.7 ± 15.0 years, p = 0.02); the gender distribution was not different (p = 0.71). The minimal diagnosis criteria for RLS were fulfilled by 8.3% of the German and 17.0% of the Australian patients (p = 0.02). The treating physicians rated 4.3% of the German and 12.4% of the Australian patients as RLS cases. RLS prevalence was similar across all subtypes of depression. CONCLUSION: RLS is not more frequent in patients with manifest depression in Germany as compared to the general population. Possible reasons for the higher prevalence of RLS in depressive patients in Australia are discussed.
Rights: © Springer-Verlag 2012
RMID: 0020122600
DOI: 10.1007/s11818-012-0568-7
Appears in Collections:Psychiatry Publications
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