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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/74475

Type: Journal article
Title: Overweight, obesity and central obesity in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Author: Lim, S.
Davies, M.
Norman, R.
Moran, L.
Citation: Human Reproduction Update, 2012; 18(6):618-637
Publisher: Oxford Univ Press
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 1355-4786
1460-2369
Statement of
Responsibility: 
S. S. Lim, M. J. Davies, R. J. Norman, and L. J. Moran
Abstract: BACKGROUND Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is closely associated with obesity but the prevalence of obesity varies between published studies. The objective of this research was to describe the prevalence of overweight, obesity and central obesity in women with and without PCOS and to assess the confounding effect of ethnicity, geographic regions and the diagnostic criteria of PCOS on the prevalence. METHODS MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and PSYCINFO were searched for studies reporting the prevalence of overweight, obesity or central obesity in women with and without PCOS. Data were presented as prevalence (%) and risk ratio (RR) [95% confidence interval (CI)]. Random-effect models were used to calculate pooled RR. RESULTS This systematic review included 106 studies while the meta-analysis included 35 studies (15129 women). Women with PCOS had increased prevalence of overweight [RR (95% CI): 1.95 (1.52, 2.50)], obesity [2.77 (1.88, 4.10)] and central obesity [1.73 (1.31, 2.30)] compared with women without PCOS. The Caucasian women with PCOS had a greater increase in obesity prevalence than the Asian women with PCOS compared with women without PCOS [10.79 (5.36, 21.70) versus 2.31 (1.33, 4.00), P < 0.001 between subgroups). CONCLUSIONS Women with PCOS had a greater risk of overweight, obesity and central obesity. Although our findings support a positive association between obesity and PCOS, our conclusions are limited by the significant heterogeneity between studies and further studies are now required to determine the source of this heterogeneity. Clinical management of PCOS should include the prevention and management of overweight and obesity.
Keywords: Polycystic ovary syndrome; obesity; central obesity; prevalence; meta-analysis
Rights: © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved.
RMID: 0020122443
DOI: 10.1093/humupd/dms030
Appears in Collections:Obstetrics and Gynaecology publications
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