Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/101886
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Type: Journal article
Title: Access to primary health care services for Indigenous peoples: a framework synthesis
Author: Davy, C.
Harfield, S.
McArthur, A.
Munn, Z.
Brown, A.
Citation: International Journal for Equity in Health, 2016; 15(1):163-1-163-9
Publisher: BioMed Central
Issue Date: 2016
ISSN: 1475-9276
1475-9276
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Carol Davy, Stephen Harfield, Alexa McArthur, Zachary Munn and Alex Brown
Abstract: Background: Indigenous peoples often find it difficult to access appropriate mainstream primary health care services. Securing access to primary health care services requires more than just services that are situated within easy reach. Ensuring the accessibility of health care for Indigenous peoples who are often faced with a vast array of additional barriers including experiences of discrimination and racism, can be complex. This framework synthesis aimed to identify issues that hindered Indigenous peoples from accessing primary health care and then explore how, if at all, these were addressed by Indigenous health care services. Methods: To be included in this framework synthesis papers must have presented findings focused on access to (factors relating to Indigenous peoples, their families and their communities) or accessibility of Indigenous primary health care services. Findings were imported into NVivo and a framework analysis undertaken whereby findings were coded to and then thematically analysed using Levesque and colleague’s accessibility framework. Results: Issues relating to the cultural and social determinants of health such as unemployment and low levels of education influenced whether Indigenous patients, their families and communities were able to access health care. Indigenous health care services addressed these issues in a number of ways including the provision of transport to and from appointments, a reduction in health care costs for people on low incomes and close consultation with, if not the direct involvement of, community members in identifying and then addressing health care needs. Conclusions: Indigenous health care services appear to be best placed to overcome both the social and cultural determinants of health which hamper Indigenous peoples from accessing health care. Findings of this synthesis also suggest that Levesque and colleague’s accessibility framework should be broadened to include factors related to the health care system such as funding.
Keywords: Indigenous; Aboriginal; First Nation; Maori; Primary health care; Models of service delivery
Description: Published online: 30 September 2016
Rights: © 2016 The Author(s). Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
RMID: 0030056031
DOI: 10.1186/s12939-016-0450-5
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1061242
Appears in Collections:Public Health publications

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