Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/101963
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Type: Journal article
Title: Observation of anisotropy in the galactic cosmic-ray arrival directions at 400 TeV with IceCube
Author: Abbasi, R.
Abdou, Y.
Abu-Zayyad, T.
Ackermann, M.
Adams, J.
Aguilar, J.A.
Ahlers, M.
Allen, M.M.
Altmann, D.
Andeen, K.
Auffenberg, J.
Bai, X.
Baker, M.
Barwick, S.W.
Bay, R.
Bazo Alba, J.L.
Beattie, K.
Beatty, J.J.
Bechet, S.
Becker, J.K.
et al.
Citation: The Astrophysical Journal: an international review of astronomy and astronomical physics, 2012; 746(1):1-11
Publisher: IOP Publishing Ltd
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 0004-637X
1538-4357
Statement of
Responsibility: 
R. Abbasi ... G.C. Hill, et al., IceCube Collaboration
Abstract: In this paper we report the first observation in the Southern hemisphere of an energy dependence in the Galactic cosmic-ray anisotropy up to a few hundred TeV. This measurement was performed using cosmic-ray-induced muons recorded by the partially deployed IceCube observatory between 2009 May and 2010 May. The data include a total of 33 × 10⁹ muon events with a median angular resolution of ∼3◦. A sky map of the relative intensity in arrival direction over the Southern celestial sky is presented for cosmic-ray median energies of 20 and 400 TeV. The same large-scale anisotropy observed at median energies around 20 TeV is not present at 400 TeV. Instead, the high-energy sky map shows a different anisotropy structure including a deficit with a post-trial significance of −6.3σ. This anisotropy reveals a new feature of the Galactic cosmic-ray distribution, which must be incorporated into theories of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays.
Keywords: astroparticle physics; cosmic rays; neutrinos
Rights: © 2012. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.
DOI: 10.1088/0004-637X/746/1/33
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