Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/102141
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Type: Journal article
Title: Magnetotelluric imaging of upper crustal partial melt at Tendaho graben in Afar, Ethiopia
Author: Didana, Y.
Thiel, S.
Heinson, G.
Citation: Geophysical Research Letters, 2014; 41(9):3089-3095
Publisher: American Geophysical Union
Issue Date: 2014
ISSN: 0094-8276
1944-8007
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Yohannes Lemma Didana, Stephan Thiel, and Graham Heinson
Abstract: We report on a recent magnetotelluric (MT) survey across the Manda Hararo magmatic segment (MHMS) within the Tendaho graben in the Afar Depression in northeastern Ethiopia. Twenty-two broadband MT sites with ∼1 km station spacing were deployed along a profile with the recorded data covering a period range from 0.003 s to 1000 s. A two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model reveals an upper crustal fracture zone (fault) and partial melt with resistivity of 1–10Ωm at a depth of >1 km. The partial melt has a maximum horizontal width of 15 km and extends to a depth of 15 km within the Afar Stratoid Series basalts. We estimate a melt fraction of about 13% based on geochemical and borehole data, and bulk resistivity from the 2-D MT inversion model. The interpreted upper crustal partial melt may have been formed by either a magma intrusion from mantle sources or a large volume of continental crust that has been fluxed by a small amount of mantle melt and heat. Within the MHMS and Tendaho graben, a magma intrusion is a plausible explanation for the upper crustal conductor. The inferred presence of a conductive fracture zone or fault with hydrothermal fluid and shallow heat sourcing magma reservoir also makes the Tendaho graben a promising prospect for the development of conventional hydrothermal geothermal energy.
Rights: © 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.
DOI: 10.1002/2014GL060000
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 7
Geology & Geophysics publications

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