Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/102351
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Type: Journal article
Title: Germination-enhancing and zinc-sparing roles for selenium in broccoli
Author: Mao, H.
Wang, Z.
Lyons, G.
Citation: Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica Section B: Soil and Plant Science, 2015; 65(2):141-149
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Issue Date: 2015
ISSN: 0906-4710
1651-1913
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Hui Mao, Zhaohui Wang and Graham Lyons
Abstract: Large areas of China have soils low in both available selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn). In order to investigate whether Se supplied as either selenate or selenite can increase germination and growth compared with low-Se controls we used broccoli, an important vegetable with anticancer effects, especially when biofortified with Se. Broccoli was grown under both Zn adequacy and Zn deficiency to determine whether interactions between these minerals affect plant growth. Selenite and selenate at a wide range of doses increased the speed and extent of germination. Both inorganic Se forms increased early root and shoot growth at low concentrations, with selenite having a stronger effect than selenate. A sand culture trial showed a similar growth increase due to lowdose Se under Zn deficiency but not under Zn adequacy. Conversely, at high Se levels, the results provided evidence from biomass, water use, photosynthesis and gas exchange that broccoli growth was inhibited at high Se levels, with selenite being more toxic than selenate. In this broccoli trial, the two Se forms were equally effective in increasing leaf Se concentration, whereas in most plants selenite is largely converted to organic Se forms and stored in the roots. This study suggests that Se, supplied either as selenate or selenite, may improve germination and growth in broccoli, especially on Zn-deficient soils. Field trials conducted on soils which are very low in both plant-available Se and Zn are needed.
Keywords: selenite; selenate; zinc deficiency; sand culture; toxic
Description: Published online: 11 Nov 2014
Rights: © 2014 Taylor & Francis
RMID: 0030055712
DOI: 10.1080/09064710.2014.978884
Appears in Collections:Agriculture, Food and Wine publications

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