Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/103017
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Type: Journal article
Title: Interspecific competition between two generalist parasitoids that attack the leafroller Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)
Author: Feng, Y.
Wratten, S.
Sandhu, H.
Keller, M.
Citation: Bulletin of Entomological Research, 2015; 105(4):426-433
Publisher: CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS
Issue Date: 2015
ISSN: 0007-4853
1475-2670
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Y. Feng, S. Wratten, H. Sandhu and M. Keller
Abstract: Two generalist parasitoids, Dolichogenidea tasmanica (Cameron) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and Therophilus unimaculatus (Turner) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) attack early instars of tortricid moths, including the light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). The two parasitoids co-exist in natural habitats, while D. tasmanica is dominant in vineyards, whereas T. unimaculatus occurs mainly in adjacent native vegetation. This difference suggests possible competition between the two species, mediated by habitat. Here, we report on the extent of interspecific differences in host discrimination and the outcome of interspecific competition between the two parasitoids. The parasitoids did not show different behavioural responses to un-parasitized hosts or those that were parasitized by the other species. Larvae of D. tasmanica out-competed those of T. unimaculatus, irrespective of the order or interval between attacks by the two species. The host larvae that were attacked by two parasitoids died more frequently before a parasitoid completed its larval development than those that were attacked by a single parasitoid. Dissection of host larvae parasitized by both species indicated that first instars of D. tasmanica attacked and killed larval T. unimaculatus.
Keywords: Dolichogenidea tasmanica; Therophilus unimaculatus; host discrimination; intrinsic competition; light brown apple moth; parasitoid; searching behavior
Rights: © Cambridge University Press 2015
RMID: 0030034300
DOI: 10.1017/S0007485314000923
Appears in Collections:Agriculture, Food and Wine publications

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