Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/103269
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Type: Journal article
Title: Cognitive-behavioural therapy has no effect on disease activity but improves quality of life in subgroups of patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a pilot randomised controlled trial
Author: Mikocka-Walus, A.
Bampton, P.
Hetzel, D.
Hughes, P.
Esterman, A.
Andrews, J.
Citation: BMC Gastroenterology, 2015; 15(1):54-1-54-12
Publisher: BioMed Central
Issue Date: 2015
ISSN: 1471-230X
1471-230X
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Antonina Mikocka-Walus, Peter Bampton, David Hetzel, Patrick Hughes, Adrian Esterman and Jane M Andrews
Abstract: Background: Studies have demonstrated usefulness of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) in managing distress in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, few have focused on IBD course. The present trial aimed to investigate whether adding CBT to standard treatment prolongs remission in IBD in comparison to standard therapy alone. Methods: A 2-arm parallel pragmatic randomised controlled trial (+CBT – standard care plus either face-to-face (F2F) or online CBT over 10 weeks versus standard care alone (SC)) was conducted with adult patients in remission. IBD remission at 12 months since baseline was the primary outcome measure while the secondary outcome measures were mental health status and quality of life (QoL). Linear mixed-effect models were used to compare groups on outcome variables while controlling for baseline. Results: Participants were 174 patients with IBD (90 +CBT, 84 SC). There was no difference in remission rates between groups, with similar numbers flaring at 12 months. Groups did not differ in anxiety, depression or coping at 6 or 12 months (p >0.05). When only participants classified as ‘in need’ (young, high baseline IBD activity, recently diagnosed; poor mental health) were examined in the post-hoc analysis (n = 74, 34 CBT and 40 controls), CBT significantly improved mental QoL (p = .034, d = .56) at 6 months. Online CBT group had a higher score on Precontemplation than the F2F group, which is consistent with less developed coping with IBD in the cCBT group (p = .045). Conclusions: Future studies should direct psychological interventions to patients ‘in need’ and attempt to recruit larger samples to compensate for significant attrition when using online CBT.
Keywords: Cognitive-behavioural therapy; Flare, Mental health; Psychological; Quality of life; Remission
Rights: © 2015 Mikocka-Walus et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
RMID: 0030029377
DOI: 10.1186/s12876-015-0278-2
Appears in Collections:Psychology publications

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