Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/103309
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Type: Journal article
Title: Decompression melting driving intraplate volcanism in Australia: evidence from magnetotelluric sounding
Author: Aivazpourporgou, S.
Thiel, S.
Hayman, P.
Moresi, L.
Heinson, G.
Citation: Geophysical Research Letters, 2015; 42(2):346-354
Publisher: Wiley
Issue Date: 2015
ISSN: 0094-8276
1944-8007
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Sahereh Aivazpourporgou, Stephan Thiel, Patrick C. Hayman, Louis N.Moresi and Graham Heinson
Abstract: A long-period magnetotelluric (MT) survey, with 39 sites covering an area of 270 by 150 km, has identified melt within the thinned lithosphere of Pleistocene-Holocene Newer Volcanics Province (NVP) in southeast Australia, which has been variously attributed to mantle plume activity or edge-driven mantle convection. Two-dimensional inversions from the MT array imaged a low-resistivity anomaly (10–30Ωm) beneath the NVP at ~40–80 km depth, which is consistent with the presence of ~1.5–4% partial melt in the lithosphere, but inconsistent with elevated iron content, metasomatism products or a hot spot. The conductive zone is located within thin juvenile oceanic mantle lithosphere, which was accreted onto thicker Proterozoic continental mantle lithosphere. We propose that the NVP owes its origin to decompression melting within the asthenosphere, promoted by lithospheric thickness variations in conjunction with rapid shear, where asthenospheric material is drawn by shear flow at a “step” at the base of the lithosphere.
Keywords: Presence of large conductor in the lithosphere; Presence of partial melt underneath an intraplate volcanic field in Australia; Magma genesis caused by decompression meltingse of the lithosphere
Rights: ©2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.
RMID: 0030024595
DOI: 10.1002/2014GL060088
Appears in Collections:Physics publications

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