Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/104068
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Type: Journal article
Title: Targeted capture to assess neutral genomic variation in the narrow-leaf hopbush across a continental biodiversity refugium
Author: Christmas, M.
Biffin, E.
Breed, M.
Lowe, A.
Citation: Scientific Reports, 2017; 7(1):41367-1-41367-10
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Issue Date: 2017
ISSN: 2045-2322
2045-2322
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Matthew J. Christmas, Ed Biffin, Martin F. Breed & Andrew J. Lowe
Abstract: The Adelaide geosyncline, a mountainous region in central southern Australia, is purported to be an important continental refugium for Mediterranean and semi-arid Australian biota, yet few population genetic studies have been conducted to test this theory. Here, we focus on a plant species distributed widely throughout the region, the narrow-leaf hopbush, Dodonaea viscosa ssp. angustissima, and examine its genetic diversity and population structure. We used a hybrid-capture target enrichment technique to selectively sequence over 700 genes from 89 individuals across 17 sampling locations. We compared 815 single nucleotide polymorphisms among individuals and populations to investigate population genetic structure. Three distinct genetic clusters were identified; a Flinders/Gammon ranges cluster, an Eastern cluster, and a Kangaroo Island cluster. Higher genetic diversity was identified in the Flinders/Gammon Ranges cluster, indicating that this area is likely to have acted as a refugium during past climate oscillations. We discuss these findings and consider the historical range dynamics of these populations. We also provide methodological considerations for population genomics studies that aim to use novel genomic approaches (such as target capture methods) on non-model systems. The application of our findings to restoration of this species across the region are also considered.
Rights: © The Author(s) 2017. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
RMID: 0030064118
DOI: 10.1038/srep41367
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP110100721
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DE150100542
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP150103414
Published version: http://www.nature.com/articles/srep41367
Appears in Collections:Environment Institute publications

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