Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/104350
Type: Conference paper
Title: A constitutive model for cemented geomaterials
Author: Yu, C.-.J.
Deng, A.
Nguyen, G.
Citation: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Structural Integrity and Failure (SIF-2016): Advances in Materials and Structures, 2016 / Kotousov, A., Ma, J. (ed./s), pp.202-207
Publisher: School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide
Issue Date: 2016
Conference Name: International Conference on Structural Integrity and Failure (SIF): Advances in Materials and Structures (12 Jul 2016 - 15 Jul 2016 : Adelaide, Australia)
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Chengjun Yu, An Deng, Giang D. Nguyen
Abstract: This study presents a constitutive model developed for lightly cemented geomaterials. The cemented geomaterials, when subjected to loading, exhibit hybrid mechanical responses: elastic-brittle due to bond breaking and elastic-plastic due to grains friction. This constitutive model is developed to capture the two mechanical responses by using three physical elements, i.e., the spring, the bond and the slider. These elements are combined to mimic the mechanical responses of lightly cemented soils under triaxial loading conditions. The model formulation is presented and validation with experimental data performed to demonstrate its capability in capturing the material behavior under both low and high confining pressures.
Keywords: Parallel bond model; constitutive modelling; geo-mechanics; cemented geomaterials
Description: Co-hosted by the University of Adelaide and the University of South Australia, under the auspices of the Australian Fracture Group (AFG).
Rights: © The author(s)
RMID: 0030064683
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP140103004
Published version: https://mecheng.adelaide.edu.au/news/sif-2016/
Appears in Collections:Civil and Environmental Engineering publications

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