Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/104652
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Type: Journal article
Title: Phenotypic plasticity and its genetic regulation for yield, nitrogen fixation and δ ¹³ C in chickpea crops under varying water regimes
Other Titles: Phenotypic plasticity and its genetic regulation for yield, nitrogen fixation and delta (13) C in chickpea crops under varying water regimes
Author: Sadras, V.
Lake, L.
Li, Y.
Farquharson, E.
Sutton, T.
Citation: Journal of Experimental Botany, 2016; 67(14):4339-4351
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Issue Date: 2016
ISSN: 0022-0957
1460-2431
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Victor O. Sadras, Lachlan Lake, Yongle Li, Elizabeth A. Farquharson, Tim Sutton
Abstract: We measured yield components, nitrogen fixation, soil nitrogen uptake and carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) in a collection of chickpea genotypes grown in environments where water availability was the main source of yield variation. We aimed to quantify the phenotypic plasticity of these traits using variance ratios, and to explore their genetic basis using FST genome scan. Fifty-five genes in three genomic regions were found to be under selection for plasticity of yield; 54 genes in four genomic regions for the plasticity of seeds per m(2); 48 genes in four genomic regions for the plasticity of δ(13)C; 54 genes in two genomic regions for plasticity of flowering time; 48 genes in five genomic regions for plasticity of nitrogen fixation and 49 genes in three genomic regions for plasticity of nitrogen uptake from soil. Plasticity of yield was related to plasticity of nitrogen uptake from soil, and unrelated to plasticity of nitrogen fixation, highlighting the need for closer attention to nitrogen uptake in legumes. Whereas the theoretical link between δ(13)C and transpiration efficiency is strong, the actual link with yield is erratic due to trade-offs and scaling issues. Genes associated with plasticity of δ(13)C were identified that may help to untangle the δ(13)C-yield relationship. Combining a plasticity perspective to deal with complex G×E interactions with FST genome scan may help understand and improve both crop adaptation to stress and yield potential.
Keywords: Drought
FST genome scan
nitrogen
plasticity
seed number
trade-off
yield potential.
Rights: © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved.
DOI: 10.1093/jxb/erw221
Appears in Collections:Agriculture, Food and Wine publications
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