Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/10472
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Type: Journal article
Title: Early peri-operative glycaemic control and allograft rejection in patients with diabetes mellitus: A pilot study
Author: Thomas, M.
Mathew, T.
Russ, G.
Rao, M.
Moran, J.
Citation: Transplantation, 2001; 72(7):1321-1324
Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Issue Date: 2001
ISSN: 0041-1337
1534-6080
Abstract: <h4>Background</h4>Hyperglycemia alters the inflammatory response to infection and ischemia. We hypothesize that perioperative glycemic control could also influence the risk for allograft rejection.<h4>Methods</h4>Consecutive patients with established diabetes undergoing their first cadaveric renal transplantation and receiving steroid-sparing immunosuppression were identified (n=50). Records of capillary glucose observations over the first 100 hr following surgery and transplantation variables pertaining to graft function, acute rejection, and postoperative infection were identified and entered into multivariate analysis.<h4>Results</h4>Perioperative glycemic control was associated with an increased incidence of infection and acute rejection. Only 3 of 27 patients (11%) with optimal glycemic control during the 100 hr following surgery (mean<11.2 mmol/L) had rejection episodes compared with 58% of patients with poor control (>11.2 mmol/L). All patients with poor glycemic control experienced postoperative infection.<h4>Conclusions</h4>This pilot study suggests that hyperglycemia may be associated with an increased risk of both allograft rejection and postoperative infection in patients with diabetes.
Keywords: Humans; Diabetic Nephropathies; Hyperglycemia; Blood Glucose; Kidney Transplantation; Transplantation, Homologous; Incidence; Pilot Projects; Graft Rejection; Time Factors; Adult; Middle Aged; Infections
RMID: 0020011123
DOI: 10.1097/00007890-200110150-00024
Appears in Collections:Surgery publications

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