Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/104906
Type: Conference paper
Title: Effect of wall confinement on a wind turbine wake
Author: Sedaghatizadeh, N.
Arjomandi, M.
Kelso, R.
Cazzolato, B.
Ghayesh, M.
Citation: Proceedings of the 20th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference, 2016 / pp.1-4
Publisher: Australian Fluid Mechanics Society
Publisher Place: online
Issue Date: 2016
ISBN: 9781740523776
Conference Name: 20th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference (05 Dec 2016 - 08 Dec 2016 : Perth, Australia)
Statement of
Responsibility: 
N. Sedaghatizadeh, M. Arjomandi, R. Kelso, B. Cazzolato, M. H. Ghayesh
Abstract: This study investigates the effect of wall confinement on a wind turbine wake as a means to guide future wind-tunnel-based wake studies. Large Eddy Simulation was utilised to simulate the wake region for two cases. The first case simulated the NREL phase VI wind turbine in a wind tunnel with 9% blockage. The reason behind selecting this case is the availability of the experimental data in the literature which enabled us in validating the model. The second case was the same turbine located in an unconfined environment, with the same flow upstream velocity. The results show that the wind tunnel walls significantly affect the wake development and its stability, even with a blockage of less than 10%. Tip vortices in the unconfined environment start to break down closer to the turbine compared to the wall-bounded case, resulting in a shorter wake recovery length for the unconfined flow. Vorticity contours reveal coherent vortical structures in the confined wake up to 20 turbine diameters downstream, while these structures dissipate after 16 diameters in an unconfined environment. The calculated power also showed that the turbine in the wind tunnel generates 5.5% more power than that in the unconfined flow. Collectively, these results provide an insight into the effect of walls on the turbine wake in both numerical and experimental studies, offering guidance on how wind tunnel studies relate to real, unconfined flows.
Rights: Commencing with 19AFMC, the Society holds copyright to papers which appear in the Proceedings. Prior to that, copyright resides with authors of the papers.
RMID: 0030066023
Published version: http://people.eng.unimelb.edu.au/imarusic/proceedings/20%20AFMC%20TOC.htm
Appears in Collections:Mechanical Engineering conference papers

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.