Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/106890
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Type: Journal article
Title: Search for intermediate mass black hole binaries in the first observing run of Advanced LIGO
Author: Abbott, B.
Abbott, R.
Abbott, T.
Acernese, F.
Ackley, K.
Adams, C.
Adams, T.
Addesso, P.
Adhikari, R.
Adya, V.
Affeldt, C.
Afrough, M.
Agarwal, B.
Agatsuma, K.
Aggarwal, N.
Aguiar, O.
Aiello, L.
Ain, A.
Allen, B.
Allen, G.
et al.
Citation: Physical Review D, 2017; 96(2):022001-1-022001-14
Publisher: American Physical Society
Issue Date: 2017
ISSN: 2470-0010
2470-0029
Statement of
Responsibility: 
B. P. Abbott, R. Abbott, T. D. Abbott … Won Kim … David J. Ottaway … Peter J. Veitch … et al.
Abstract: During their first observational run, the two Advanced LIGO detectors attained an unprecedented sensitivity, resulting in the first direct detections of gravitational-wave signals produced by stellar-mass binary black hole systems. This paper reports on an all-sky search for gravitational waves (GWs) from merging intermediate mass black hole binaries (IMBHBs). The combined results from two independent search techniques were used in this study: the first employs a matched-filter algorithm that uses a bank of filters covering the GW signal parameter space, while the second is a generic search for GW transients (bursts). No GWs from IMBHBs were detected; therefore, we constrain the rate of several classes of IMBHB mergers. The most stringent limit is obtained for black holes of individual mass 100 M⊙, with spins aligned with the binary orbital angular momentum. For such systems, the merger rate is constrained to be less than 0.93 Gpc−3 yr−1 in comoving units at the 90% confidence level, an improvement of nearly 2 orders of magnitude over previous upper limits.
Rights: © 2017 American Physical Society
RMID: 0030073174
DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.96.022001
Appears in Collections:Physics publications

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