Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/107176
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Type: Journal article
Title: Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 3 (OsGPAT3) is required for anther development and male fertility in rice
Author: Men, X.
Shi, J.
Liang, W.
Zhang, Q.
Lian, G.
Quan, S.
Zhu, L.
Luo, Z.
Chen, M.
Zhang, D.
Citation: Journal of Experimental Botany, 2017; 68(3):513-526
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Issue Date: 2017
ISSN: 0022-0957
1460-2431
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Xiao Men, Jianxin Shi, Wanqi Liang, Qianfei Zhang, Gaibin Lian, Sheng Quan, Lu Zhu, Zhijing Luo, Mingjiao Chen, Dabing Zhang
Abstract: Lipid molecules are key structural components of plant male reproductive organs, such as the anther and pollen. Although advances have been made in the understanding of acyl lipids in plant reproduction, the metabolic pathways of other lipid compounds, particularly glycerolipids, are not fully understood. Here we report that an endoplasmic reticulum-localized enzyme, Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase 3 (OsGPAT3), plays an indispensable role in anther development and pollen formation in rice. OsGPAT3 is preferentially expressed in the tapetum and microspores of the anther. Compared with wild-type plants, the osgpat3 mutant displays smaller, pale yellow anthers with defective anther cuticle, degenerated pollen with defective exine, and abnormal tapetum development and degeneration. Anthers of the osgpat3 mutant have dramatic reductions of all aliphatic lipid contents. The defective cuticle and pollen phenotype coincide well with the down-regulation of sets of genes involved in lipid metabolism and regulation of anther development. Taking these findings together, this work reveals the indispensable role of a monocot-specific glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase in male reproduction in rice.
Keywords: Anther development; glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase; lipid metabolism; male sterility; microgametophyte; rice; tapetum.
Rights: © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
RMID: 0030066455
DOI: 10.1093/jxb/erw445
Appears in Collections:Environment Institute publications

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