Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/107295
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Type: Journal article
Title: Species interactions drive fish biodiversity loss in a high-CO₂ world
Other Titles: Species interactions drive fish biodiversity loss in a high-CO(2) world
Author: Nagelkerken, I.
Goldenberg, S.
Ferreira, C.
Russell, B.
Connell, S.
Citation: Current Biology, 2017; 27(14):2177-2184.e4
Publisher: Elsevier
Issue Date: 2017
ISSN: 0960-9822
1879-0445
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Ivan Nagelkerken, Silvan U. Goldenberg, Camilo M. Ferreira, Bayden D. Russell, and Sean D. Connell
Abstract: Accelerating climate change is eroding the functioning and stability of ecosystems by weakening the interactions among species that stabilize biological communities against change [1]. A key challenge to forecasting the future of ecosystems centers on how to extrapolate results from short-term, single-species studies to community-level responses that are mediated by key mechanisms such as competition, resource availability (bottom-up control), and predation (top-down control) [2]. We used CO₂ vents as potential analogs of ocean acidification combined with in situ experiments to test current predictions of fish biodiversity loss and community change due to elevated CO₂ [3] and to elucidate the potential mechanisms that drive such change. We show that high risk-taking behavior and competitive strength, combined with resource enrichment and collapse of predator populations, fostered already common species, enabling them to double their populations under acidified conditions. However, the release of these competitive dominants from predator control led to suppression of less common and subordinate competitors that did not benefit from resource enrichment and reduced predation. As a result, local biodiversity was lost and novel fish community compositions were created under elevated CO₂. Our study identifies the species interactions most affected by ocean acidification, revealing potential sources of natural selection. We also reveal how diminished predator abundances can have cascading effects on local species diversity, mediated by complex species interactions. Reduced overfishing of predators could therefore act as a key action to stall diversity loss and ecosystem change in a high-CO₂ world.
Keywords: climate change
Rights: © 2017 Elsevier Ltd.
RMID: 0030072849
DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2017.06.023
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT120100183
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP150104263
Appears in Collections:Earth and Environmental Sciences publications

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