Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/107365
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dc.contributor.authorRao, L.-
dc.contributor.authorDunn, J.-
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Y.-
dc.contributor.authorLi, S.-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationScientific Reports, 2015; 5(1):15831-1-15831-10-
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/107365-
dc.description.abstractPeople frequently change their preferences for options of gambles which they play once compared to those they play multiple times. In general, preferences for repeated play gambles are more consistent with the expected values of the options. According to the one-process view, the change in preference is due to a change in the structure of the gamble that is relevant to decision making. According to the two-process view, the change is attributable to a shift in the decision making strategy that is used. To adjudicate between these two theories, we asked participants to choose between gambles played once or 100 times, and to choose between them based on their expected value. Consistent with the two-process theory, we found a set of brain regions that were sensitive to the extent of behavioral change between single and aggregated play and also showed significant (de)activation in the expected value choice task. These results support the view that people change their decision making strategies for risky choice considered once or multiple times.-
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityLi-Lin Rao, John C. Dunn, Yuan Zhou and Shu Li-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/-
dc.source.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep15831-
dc.subjectBrain-
dc.subjectNeurons-
dc.subjectHumans-
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imaging-
dc.subjectBrain Mapping-
dc.subjectGambling-
dc.subjectDecision Making-
dc.subjectAdult-
dc.subjectFemale-
dc.subjectMale-
dc.subjectYoung Adult-
dc.titleThe neural correlates of risky decision making across short and long runs-
dc.typeJournal article-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep15831-
pubs.publication-statusPublished-
dc.identifier.orcidDunn, J. [0000-0002-3950-3460]-
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 8
Psychology publications

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