Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/107735
Type: Conference paper
Title: Computational thinking, the notional machine, pre-service teachers, and research opportunities
Author: Bower, M.
Falkner, K.
Citation: Proceedings of the 17th Australasian Computing Education Conference, 2015 / pp.37-46
Publisher: Australian Computer Society Inc.
Issue Date: 2015
Series/Report no.: Conferences in Research and Practice in Information Technology (CRPIT), Vol. 160
Conference Name: 17th Australasian Computing Education Conference (ACE 2015) (27 Jan 2015 - 30 Jan 2015 : Sydney, Australia)
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Matt Bower, Katrina Falkner
Abstract: There is general consensus regarding the urgent and pressing need to develop school students' computational thinking abilities, and to help school teachers develop computational thinking pedagogies. One possible reason that teachers (and students) may struggle with computational thinking processes is because they have poorly developed mental models of how computers work, i.e., they have inadequate "notional machines". Based on a pilot survey of 44 pre-service teachers this paper explores (mis)conceptions of computational thinking, and proposes a research agenda for investigating the use of notional machine activities as a way of developing preservice teacher computational thinking pedagogical capabilities.
Keywords: Computational thinking, notional machine, teacher education, K-12
Rights: Copyright (c) 2015, Australian Computer Society, Inc. This paper appeared at the 17th Australasian Computer Education Conference (ACE 2015), Sydney, Australia, January 2015. Conferences in Research and Practice in Information Technology (CRPIT), Vol. 160. D. D'Souza and K. Falkner, Eds. Reproduction for academic, not-for profit purposes permitted provided this text is included.
RMID: 0030043747
Published version: http://crpit.com/Vol160.html
Appears in Collections:Computer Science publications

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