Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/109635
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Vegetation damage caused by high densities of burrowing bettongs (Bettongia lesueur) at Arid Recovery
Author: Linley, G.
Moseby, K.
Paton, D.
Citation: Australian Mammalogy, 2017; 39(1):33-41
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Issue Date: 2017
ISSN: 0310-0049
1836-7402
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Grant D. Linley, Katherine E. Moseby and David C. Paton
Abstract: Burrowing bettongs (Bettongia lesueur) reached high densities within the fenced Arid Recovery reserve. Grazing pressure was assessed by comparing the vegetation inside and outside the reserve during April in 2012, 2013 and 2014. Mean numbers of bettong tracks crossing small 10 m × 1 m plots overnight in the main exclosure were 20 in 2012, decreasing to 4 in 2013 and 3 in 2014. Similar declines were present in the second expansion, where tracks decreased from 7 in 2012 to 3 in 2013 and 2 in 2014. Perennial plant species richness decreased significantly over the study period. Acacia aneura, Acacia ligulata, Atriplex vesicaria, Crotalaria eremaea, Dodonaea viscosa, Enchylaena tomentosa, Maireana astrotricha and Sida ammophila were the most heavily grazed species within the reserve. Overall, more than 25% of plants showed some form of conspicuous grazing. C. eremaea and E. tomentosa showed little damage outside the reserve. Inside the reserve many C. eremaea were dead and heavily browsed and few E. tomentosa remained. Recent recruitment of A. ligulata and D. viscosa was also much higher outside the reserve. High densities of burrowing bettongs were associated with declines in vegetation condition potentially impacting other species and the ecosystem as a whole.
Keywords: Reintroduced population, South Australia
Rights: Journal compilation © Australian Mammalogy Society 2017
RMID: 0030067067
DOI: 10.1071/AM15040
Appears in Collections:Earth and Environmental Sciences publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.