Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/110994
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Type: Journal article
Title: Fluorescence brightness and photostability of individual copper (I) oxide nanocubes
Author: Zohora, N.
Kandjani, A.
Orth, A.
Brown, H.
Hutchinson, M.
Gibson, B.
Citation: Scientific Reports, 2017; 7(1):16905-1-16905-8
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Issue Date: 2017
ISSN: 2045-2322
2045-2322
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Nafisa Zohora, Ahmad Esmaielzadeh Kandjani, Antony Orth, Hannah M. Brown, Mark R. Hutchinson and Brant C. Gibson
Abstract: Conventional organic fluorophores lose their ability to fluoresce after repeated exposure to excitation light due to photobleaching. Therefore, research into emerging bright and photostable nanomaterials has become of great interest for a range of applications such as bio-imaging and tracking. Among these emerging fluorophores, metal oxide-based nanomaterials have attracted significant attention as a potential multifunctional material with photocatalytic and angeogenisis abilities in addition to fluorescnce applications. However, most of these applications are highly dependent on size, morphology, and chemo-physical properties of individual particles. In this manuscript, we present a method to study the intrinsic optical characteristics of individual copper (I) oxide (Cu2O) nanocubes. When excited at 520 nm using only 11 µW excitation power (1.7 W/cm2), individual nanocubes were observed to emit light with peak wavelengths ~760 nm which is conveniently within the near-infrared 1 (NIR1) biological window where tissue autofluorescence is minimal. Bright and photostable fluorescence was observed with intensities up to 487 K counts/s under constant illumination for at least 2 minutes with a brightness approximately four times higher than the autofluorescence from a fixed cumulus-oocyte complex. With near-IR emission, high fluorescence brightness, and outstanding photostability, Cu2O nanocubes are attractive candidates for long-term fluorescent bioimaging applications.
Rights: © The Author(s) 2017. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
RMID: 0030079081
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-17295-0
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT110100225
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LE140100131
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/CE140100003
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT110100225
Appears in Collections:Paediatrics publications

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