Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/111547
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Type: Journal article
Title: Does an 'activity-permissive' workplace change office workers' sitting and activity time?
Author: Gorman, E.
Ashe, M.
Dunstan, D.
Hanson, H.
Madden, K.
Winkler, E.
McKay, H.
Healy, G.
Citation: PLoS One, 2013; 8(10):e76723-1-e76723-6
Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Issue Date: 2013
ISSN: 1932-6203
1932-6203
Editor: O'Connor, K.
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Erin Gorman, Maureen C. Ashe, David W. Dunstan, Heather M. Hanson, Ken Madden, Elisabeth A.H. Winkler, Heather A. McKay, Genevieve N. Healy
Abstract: Introduction: To describe changes in workplace physical activity, and health-, and work-related outcomes, in workers who transitioned from a conventional to an 'activity-permissive' workplace. Methods: A natural pre-post experiment conducted in Vancouver, Canada in 2011. A convenience sample of office-based workers (n=24, 75% women, mean [SD] age = 34.5 [8.1] years) were examined four months following relocation from a conventional workplace (pre) to a newly-constructed, purpose-built, movement-oriented physical environment (post). Workplace activity- (activPAL3-derived stepping, standing, and sitting time), health- (body composition and fasting cardio-metabolic blood profile), and work- (performance; job satisfaction) related outcomes were measured pre- and post-move and compared using paired t-tests. Results: Pre-move, on average (mean [SD]) the majority of the day was spent sitting (364 [43.0] mins/8-hr workday), followed by standing (78.2 [32.1] mins/8-hr workday) and stepping (37.7 [15.6] mins/8-hr workday). The transition to the 'activity-permissive' workplace resulted in a significant increase in standing time (+18.5, 95% CI: 1.8, 35.2 mins/8-hr workday), likely driven by reduced sitting time (-19.7, 95% CI: -42.1, 2.8 mins/8-hr workday) rather than increased stepping time (+1.2, 95% CI: -6.2, 8.5 mins/8-hr workday). There were no statistically significant differences observed in health- or work-related outcomes. Discussion: This novel, opportunistic study demonstrated that the broader workplace physical environment can beneficially impact on standing time in office workers. The long-term health and work-related benefits, and the influence of individual, organizational, and social factors on this change, requires further evaluation.
Keywords: Employment; physical activity; labor studies; graduates; insulin; blood; fats; health informatics
Rights: © 2013 Gorman et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0076723
Grant ID: ARC
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/569861
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 3
Psychology publications

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