Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/111782
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Type: Journal article
Title: Can early weight loss, eating behaviors and socioeconomic factors predict successful weight loss at 12- and 24-months in adolescents with obesity and insulin resistance participating in a randomised controlled trial?
Author: Gow, M.
Baur, L.
Ho, M.
Chisholm, K.
Noakes, M.
Cowell, C.
Garnett, S.
Citation: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2016; 13(1):43-1-43-11
Publisher: BioMed Central
Issue Date: 2016
ISSN: 1479-5868
1479-5868
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Megan L. Gow, Louise A. Baur, Mandy Ho, Kerryn Chisholm, Manny Noakes, Chris T. Cowell and Sarah P. Garnett
Abstract: Background: Lifestyle interventions in adolescents with obesity can result in weight loss following active intervention but individual responses vary widely. This study aimed to identify predictors of weight loss at 12- and 24-months in adolescents with obesity and clinical features of insulin resistance. Methods: Adolescents (n = 111, 66 girls, aged 10–17 years) were participants in a randomised controlled trial, the RESIST study, examining the effects of two diets differing in macronutrient content on insulin sensitivity. Eighty-five completed the 12-month program and 24-month follow-up data were available for 42 adolescents. Change in weight was determined by BMI expressed as a percentage of the 95th percentile (BMI95). The study physician collected socioeconomic data at baseline. Physical activity and screen time, and psychological dimensions of eating behavior were self-reported using the validated CLASS and EPI-C questionnaires, respectively. Stepwise multiple regressions were conducted to identify models that best predicted change in BMI95 at 12- and 24-months. Results: Mean BMI95 was reduced at 12-months compared with baseline (mean difference [MD] ± SE: -6.9 ± 1.0, P < 0.001) but adolescents had significant re-gain from 12- to 24-months (MD ± SE: 3.7 ± 1.5, P = 0.017). Participants who achieved greater 12-month weight loss had: greater 3-month weight loss, a father with a higher education, lower baseline external eating and parental pressure to eat scores and two parents living at home. Participants who achieved greater 24-month weight loss had: greater 12-month weight loss and a lower baseline emotional eating score. Conclusions: Early weight loss is consistently identified as a strong predictor of long-term weight loss. This could be because early weight loss identifies those more motivated and engaged individuals. Patients who have baseline factors predictive of long-term weight loss failure may benefit from additional support during the intervention. Additionally, if a patient does not achieve early weight loss, further support or transition to an alternate intervention where they may have increased success may be considered.
Keywords: Pediatric; obesityInsulin resistance; predictors; eating behaviors; socioeconomic; weight loss; RESIST
Rights: © Gow et al. 2016. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
RMID: 0030084281
DOI: 10.1186/s12966-016-0367-9
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/457225
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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