Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/111934
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Type: Journal article
Title: Evaluating water demand shortfalls in segment analysis
Author: Creaco, E.
Franchini, M.
Alvisi, S.
Citation: Water Resources Management, 2012; 26(8):2301-2321
Publisher: Springer
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 0920-4741
1573-1650
Statement of
Responsibility: 
E. Creaco, M. Franchini, S. Alvisi
Abstract: In this paper, two procedures for assessing water demand shortfalls following segment isolation are compared. The first (topological) procedure is based on a simple topological network analysis, and identifies the water demand shortfall as the water demand (under normal operational conditions) relative to the directly and/or indirectly isolated segment(s). The second (hydraulic) procedure is based on a pressure-driven hydraulic simulation of the network after segment isolation. Each of the two procedures was applied to two case studies, and the reliability (expressed in terms of maximum D max and weighted average D¯¯¯¯ water demand shortfall) and economic burden (expressed in terms of number N val or cost C val of installed valves) of the resulting isolation valve system solution were compared. As a whole, the results show that network analysis and redesign are affected by the choice of the global variables (D max or D¯¯¯¯) used to characterize the demand shortfalls in network segments. Analysis of the case studies is followed by a discussion of the rationale behind the choice between the two procedures, which needs to balance accurate demand shortfall characterization with limited computation times, particularly in the multi-objective design stage.
Keywords: Valves; water distribution systems; multi-objective algorithm; system reliability; pressure-driven
Rights: © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012
RMID: 0030079029
DOI: 10.1007/s11269-012-0018-0
Appears in Collections:Civil and Environmental Engineering publications

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