Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/112079
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dc.contributor.authorVarghese, B.en
dc.contributor.authorDent, E.en
dc.contributor.authorChilver, M.en
dc.contributor.authorCameron, S.en
dc.contributor.authorStocks, N.en
dc.date.issued2018en
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiology and Infection, 2018; 146(5):619-626en
dc.identifier.issn0950-2688en
dc.identifier.issn1469-4409en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/112079-
dc.description.abstractAcute respiratory infections cause significant morbidity and mortality accounting for 5.8 million deaths worldwide. In Australia, influenza-like illness (ILI), defined as cough, fever and fatigue is a common presentation in general practice and results in reduced productivity and lost working days. Little is known about the epidemiology of ILI in working-age adults. Using data from the ASPREN influenza surveillance network in Australia (2010-2013) we found that working-age adults made up 45.2% of all ILI notifications with 55% of samples positive for at least one respiratory virus. Viruses most commonly detected in our study included influenza A (20.6%), rhinovirus (18.6%), influenza B (6.2%), human meta-pneumovirus (3.4%), respiratory syncytial virus (3.1%), para-influenza virus (2.6%) and adenovirus (1.3%). We also demonstrated that influenza A is the predominant virus that increases ILI (by 1.2% per month for every positive influenza A case) in working-age adults during autumn-winter months while other viruses are active throughout the year. Understanding the epidemiology of viral respiratory infections through a year will help clinicians make informed decisions about testing, antibiotic and antiviral prescribing and when the beginning of the 'flu season' can be more confidently predicted.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityB.M. Varghese, E. Dent, M. Chilver, S. Cameron and N.P. Stocksen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.rights© Cambridge University Press 2018en
dc.subjectInfluenza; respiratory infections; surveillance; virus infectionen
dc.titleEpidemiology of viral respiratory infections in Australian working-age adults (20-64 years): 2010-2013en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0030082767en
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0950268818000286en
dc.relation.granthttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1112672en
dc.identifier.pubid397640-
pubs.library.collectionPublic Health publicationsen
pubs.library.teamDS14en
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.identifier.orcidVarghese, B. [0000-0003-2974-7282]en
dc.identifier.orcidDent, E. [0000-0002-4006-3992]en
dc.identifier.orcidChilver, M. [0000-0001-6369-8483]en
dc.identifier.orcidCameron, S. [0000-0002-5574-2568]en
dc.identifier.orcidStocks, N. [0000-0002-9018-0361]en
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