Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/112530
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Type: Book chapter
Title: A new acoustic energy- based method to estimate pre-loads on cored rocks
Author: Karakus, M.
Thurlow, W.
Ingerson, A.
Genockey, M.
Jones, J.
Citation: Handbook of Research on Trends and Digital Advances in Engineering Geology, 2017 / Ceryan, C. (ed./s), Ch.8, pp.281-325
Publisher: IGI Global
Publisher Place: Hershey, PA, USA
Issue Date: 2017
Series/Report no.: Advances in Civil and Industrial Engineering
ISBN: 1522527095
9781522527091
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Murat Karakus, Ashton Ingerson, William Thurlow, Michael Genockey and Jesse Jones
Abstract: The Acoustic Emission (AE) due to the sudden release of energy from the micro-fracturing within the rock under loading has been used to estimate pre-load. Once the pre-load is exceeded an irreversible damage occurs at which AE signals significantly increase. This phenomenon known as Kaiser Effect (KE) can be recognised as an inflexion point in the cumulative AE hits versus stress curve. In order to determine the value of pre-load (sm) accurately, the curve may be approximated by two straight lines. The intersection point projected onto the stress axis indicates the pre-load. However, in some cases locating the point of inflexion is not easy. To overcome this problem we have developed a new method, The University of Adelaide Method (UoA), which use cumulative acoustic energy. Unlike existing methods, the UoA method emphasises the energy of each AE, the square term of the amplitude of each AE. As the axial pre-load is exceeded, the micro cracks become larger than the existing fractures and therefore energy released with new and larger cracks retain higher acoustic energy.
Rights: Copyright © 2018 by IGI Global. All rights reserved.
RMID: 0030075998
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-2709-1.ch008
Published version: https://www.igi-global.com/gateway/book/178212
Appears in Collections:Civil and Environmental Engineering publications

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