Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/112938
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Type: Journal article
Title: Horse injury during non-commercial transport: findings from researcher-assisted intercept surveys at Southeastern Australian equestrian events
Author: Riley, C.
Noble, B.
Bridges, J.
Hazel, S.
Thompson, K.
Citation: Animals, 2016; 6(11):1-12
Publisher: MDPI
Issue Date: 2016
ISSN: 2076-2615
2076-2615
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Christopher B. Riley, Belinda R. Noble, Janis Bridges, Susan J. Hazel and Kirrilly Thompson
Abstract: Equine transportation research has largely focused on the commercial land movement of horses. Data on the incidence and factors associated with horse injuries during non-commercial transportation (privately owned horse trucks and trailers) is scant. This study surveyed 223 drivers transporting horses to 12 equestrian events in southeastern Australia. Data collected encompassed driver demographics, travel practice, vehicle characteristics, and incidents involving horse injury. Approximately 25% (55/223) of participants reported that their horses were injured during transportation. Of these 72% were owner classified as horse associated (scrambling, slipping and horse-horse interaction), 11% due to mechanical failure, and 6% due to driver error. Horse injury was not significantly associated with driver age, gender, or experience. Participants that answer the telephone whilst driving were more likely to have previously had a horse injured ( p = 0.04). There was a trend for participants with <8 hours sleep prior to the survey to have experienced a previous transportation-related injury ( p = 0.056). Increased trailer age was associated with a greater number of injury reports (r² = 0.20; p < 0.04). The diversity in trailer models prevented identification of the importance of individual design features. This study highlights the potential for horses to sustain transportation injuries in privately owned vehicles and warrants further study to address this risk to their welfare.
Keywords: Horse; equine; float; trailer; truck; injury; driver; transportation
Rights: © 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
RMID: 0030057299
DOI: 10.3390/ani6110065
Appears in Collections:Zoology publications

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