Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/113296
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Type: Journal article
Title: From gut dysbiosis to altered brain function and mental illness: mechanisms and pathways
Author: Rogers, G.
Keating, D.
Young, R.
Wong, M.
Licinio, J.
Wesselingh, S.
Citation: Molecular Psychiatry, 2016; 21(6):738-748
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Issue Date: 2016
ISSN: 1359-4184
1476-5578
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Responsibility: 
GB Rogers, DJ Keating, RL Young, M-L Wong, J Licinio, and S Wesselingh
Abstract: The human body hosts an enormous abundance and diversity of microbes, which perform a range of essential and beneficial functions. Our appreciation of the importance of these microbial communities to many aspects of human physiology has grown dramatically in recent years. We know, for example, that animals raised in a germ-free environment exhibit substantially altered immune and metabolic function, while the disruption of commensal microbiota in humans is associated with the development of a growing number of diseases. Evidence is now emerging that, through interactions with the gut-brain axis, the bidirectional communication system between the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract, the gut microbiome can also influence neural development, cognition and behaviour, with recent evidence that changes in behaviour alter gut microbiota composition, while modifications of the microbiome can induce depressive-like behaviours. Although an association between enteropathy and certain psychiatric conditions has long been recognized, it now appears that gut microbes represent direct mediators of psychopathology. Here, we examine roles of gut microbiome in shaping brain development and neurological function, and the mechanisms by which it can contribute to mental illness. Further, we discuss how the insight provided by this new and exciting field of research can inform care and provide a basis for the design of novel, microbiota-targeted, therapies.
Keywords: Dysbiosis; gastrointestinal microbiome
Rights: © GB Rogers et al (2016) This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
RMID: 0030047540
DOI: 10.1038/mp.2016.50
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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