Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/115819
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Type: Journal article
Title: Linear association between maternal age and need of medical interventions at delivery in primiparae: a cohort of 21,235 singleton births
Author: Robillard, P.-.Y.
Hulsey, T.
Boukerrou, M.
Bonsante, F.
Dekker, G.
Iacobelli, S.
Citation: The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians, 2018; 31(15):2027-2035
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Issue Date: 2018
ISSN: 1476-7058
1476-4954
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Pierre-Yves Robillard, Thomas C. Hulsey, Malik Boukerrou, Francesco Bonsante, Gustaaf Dekker and Silvia Iacobelli
Abstract: Objectives: We sought to investigate the potential association between maternal age and the need for active obstetrical intervention intrapartum in primiparas. Study design: Observational study over 14 years (2001–2014) of all consecutive primiparous singleton births having delivered at the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Hospitalier Sud Reunion’s maternity (French overseas department, Indian Ocean). Results: Of the 21,235 singleton primiparous births, there were three significant linear associations between maternal age from 12 years of age to 42 + (all χ2 for linear trend, p < .0001) (a) vaginal deliveries without any medical intervention, (b) rate of cesarean sections, and (c) rate of operative vaginal procedures. These three linear associations persisted when controlling for maternal obesity (±30 kg/m2), “heavy babies” (>3.5 kg), and ethnicity. Using maternal age remained significantly an independent risk factor (p < .0001), after controlling for the major confounders: maternal BMI, maternal height, birthweight ≥3500 g, p < .0001. Conclusions: Increasing maternal age has a linear association with vaginal deliveries without any medical intervention, rate of cesarean sections, and rate of operative vaginal procedures. These associations are independent of maternal BMI and maternal height. We currently do not have a specific explanation why younger women appear to be protected from requiring intrapartum obstetric intervention. Nevertheless, these strong facts deserve acknowledgement and further research.
Keywords: Primiparae; birthing; cesarean delivery; epidemiology; maternal age
Description: Published Online 26 June 2017
Rights: © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
RMID: 0030071233
DOI: 10.1080/14767058.2017.1334049
Appears in Collections:Obstetrics and Gynaecology publications

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