Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/116575
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Type: Journal article
Title: Day case hernia repair: weak evidence or practice gap?
Author: Scarfe, A.
Duncan, J.
Ma, N.
Cameron, A.
Rankin, D.
Karatassas, A.
Fletcher, D.
Watters, D.
Maddern, G.
Citation: ANZ Journal of Surgery, 2018; 88(6):547-553
Publisher: Wiley
Issue Date: 2018
ISSN: 1445-1433
1445-2197
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Anje Scarfe, Joanna Duncan, Ning Ma, Alun Cameron, David Rankin, Alex Karatassas, David Fletcher, David Watters, Guy Maddern
Abstract: Analysis of a private insurer's administrative data set revealed significant variation in the length of hospital stay following hernia surgery.This review examined factors influencing the performance of day surgery for inguinal, femoral and umbilical hernia repair in adults.A systematic literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases to identify studies and clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) comparing same day hernia surgery to surgery followed by an overnight stay.Screening of studies by abstract and full text was completed by a single researcher and checked by a second. Studies were selected for inclusion based on a step-wise approach across three phases.Limited evidence from one systematic review, and three case series studies including 3213 patients found that same day hernia surgery was as safe and effective as an overnight stay. All identified CPGs recommended a same day procedure for most patients. Two case series studies reported that 3-8% of patients were ineligible for day procedures due to medical reasons; however, the characteristics of patients, in general, which are not suitable, have not been adequately investigated.Day surgery for groin hernia repair is safe and effective for most patients. However, evidence-based support is only one of many factors that may contribute to the uptake of day surgery in Australia. There is an opportunity for key stakeholders across the private healthcare system to deliver an equally effective but more sustainable and affordable hernia care by increasing the day surgery rates.
Keywords: costs; day surgery; hernia; hernia repair; medical care
Rights: © 2018 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.
RMID: 0030084103
DOI: 10.1111/ans.14302
Appears in Collections:Surgery publications

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