Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/116958
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Type: Journal article
Title: Flower development: the evolutionary history and functions of the AGL6 subfamily MADS-box genes
Author: Dreni, L.
Zhang, D.
Citation: Journal of Experimental Botany, 2016; 67(6):1625-1638
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Issue Date: 2016
ISSN: 0022-0957
1460-2431
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Ludovico Dreni and Dabing Zhang
Abstract: AGL6 is an ancient subfamily of MADS-box genes found in both gymnosperms and angiosperms. Its functions remained elusive despite the fact that the MADS-box genes and the ABC model have been studied for >20 years. Nevertheless, recent discoveries in petunia, rice, and maize support its involvement in the 'E' function of floral development, very similar to the closely related AGL2 (SEPALLATA) subfamily which has been well characterized. The known functions of AGL6 span from ancient conserved roles to new functions acquired in specific plant families. The AGL6 genes are involved in floral meristem regulation, in floral organs, and ovule (integument) and seed development, and have possible roles in both male and female germline and gametophyte development. In grasses, they are also important for the development of the first whorl of the flower, whereas in Arabidopsis they may play additional roles before floral meristem formation. This review covers these recent insights and some other aspects that are not yet fully elucidated, which deserve more studies in the future.
Keywords: ABC model; AGL2; AGL6; Arabidopsis; E function; floral organ development; lodicule; MADS-box genes; ovule; petunia; palea; rice
Rights: © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
RMID: 0030047400
DOI: 10.1093/jxb/erw046
Appears in Collections:Agriculture, Food and Wine publications

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