Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/117118
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Type: Journal article
Title: Atomic force microscope cantilever calibration using a focused ion beam
Author: Slattery, A.
Quinton, J.
Gibson, C.
Citation: Nanotechnology, 2012; 23(28):1-14
Publisher: IOP Publishing
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 0957-4484
1361-6528
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Ashley D Slattery, Jamie S Quinton and Christopher T Gibson
Abstract: A calibration method is presented for determining the spring constant of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers, which is a modification of the established Cleveland added mass technique. A focused ion beam (FIB) is used to remove a well-defined volume from a cantilever with known density, substantially reducing the uncertainty usually present in the added mass method. The technique can be applied to any type of AFM cantilever; but for the lowest uncertainty it is best applied to silicon cantilevers with spring constants above 0.7 N m(-1), where uncertainty is demonstrated to be typically between 7 and 10%. Despite the removal of mass from the cantilever, the calibration method presented does not impair the probes' ability to acquire data. The technique has been extensively tested in order to verify the underlying assumptions in the method. This method was compared to a number of other calibration methods and practical improvements to some of these techniques were developed, as well as important insights into the behavior of FIB modified cantilevers. These results will prove useful to research groups concerned with the application of microcantilevers to nanoscience, in particular for cases where maintaining pristine AFM tip condition is critical.
Keywords: Ions
Silicon
Microscopy, Atomic Force
Calibration
Equipment Design
Rights: © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK & the USA
DOI: 10.1088/0957-4484/23/28/285704
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 8
Physics publications

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