Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/117321
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Type: Journal article
Title: Characterizing the shape patterns of dimorphic yeast pseudohyphae
Author: Gontar, A.
Bottema, M.
Binder, B.
Tronnolone, H.
Citation: Royal Society Open Science, 2018; 5(10):180820-1-180820-12
Publisher: Royal Society
Issue Date: 2018
ISSN: 2054-5703
2054-5703
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Amelia Gontar, Murk J. Bottema, Benjamin J. Binder and Hayden Tronnolone
Abstract: Pseudohyphal growth of the dimorphic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is analysed using two-dimensional top-down binary images. The colony morphology is characterized using clustered shape primitives (CSPs), which are learned automatically from the data and thus do not require a list of predefined features or a priori knowledge of the shape. The power of CSPs is demonstrated through the classification of pseudohyphal yeast colonies known to produce different morphologies. The classifier categorizes the yeast colonies considered with an accuracy of 0.969 and standard deviation 0.041, demonstrating that CSPs capture differences in morphology, while CSPs are found to provide greater discriminatory power than spatial indices previously used to quantify pseudohyphal growth. The analysis demonstrates that CSPs provide a promising avenue for analysing morphology in high-throughput assays.
Keywords: Clustered shape primitives; dimorphic yeast; pseudohyphal growth; shape characterization
Rights: © 2018 The Authors. Published by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/, which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited.
RMID: 0030105109
DOI: 10.1098/rsos.180820
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP160102644
Appears in Collections:Mathematical Sciences publications

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