Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/117632
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Type: Journal article
Title: Living systematic reviews: 4. Living guideline recommendations
Author: Akl, E.
Meerpohl, J.
Elliott, J.
Kahale, L.
Schünemann, H.
Agoritsas, T.
Hilton, J.
Perron, C.
Akl, E.
Hodder, R.
Pestridge, C.
Albrecht, L.
Horsley, T.
Platt, J.
Armstrong, R.
Nguyen, P.
Plovnick, R.
Arno, A.
Ivers, N.
Quinn, G.
et al.
Citation: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 2017; 91:47-53
Publisher: Elsevier
Issue Date: 2017
ISSN: 0895-4356
1878-5921
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Elie A. Akl, Joerg J. Meerpohl, Julian Elliott, Lara A. Kahale, Holger J. Schünemann … Zachary Munn … [et al.] On behalf of the Living Systematic Review Network
Abstract: While it is important for the evidence supporting practice guidelines to be current, that is often not the case. The advent of living systematic reviews has made the concept of "living guidelines" realistic, with the promise to provide timely, up-to-date and high-quality guidance to target users. We define living guidelines as an optimization of the guideline development process to allow updating individual recommendations as soon as new relevant evidence becomes available. A major implication of that definition is that the unit of update is the individual recommendation and not the whole guideline. We then discuss when living guidelines are appropriate, the workflows required to support them, the collaboration between living systematic reviews and living guideline teams, the thresholds for changing recommendations, and potential approaches to publication and dissemination. The success and sustainability of the concept of living guideline will depend on those of its major pillar, the living systematic review. We conclude that guideline developers should both experiment with and research the process of living guidelines.
Keywords: Living systematic review; living guidelines; updating systematic reviews; updating guidelines; prioritizing recommendations
Rights: © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
RMID: 0030093276
DOI: 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2017.08.009
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1114605
Appears in Collections:Public Health publications

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