Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/118877
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Opioid use after total hip arthroplasty surgery is associated with revision surgery
Author: Inacio, M.
Pratt, N.
Roughead, E.
Paxton, E.
Graves, S.
Citation: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 2016; 17(1):122-1-122-9
Publisher: BMC
Issue Date: 2016
ISSN: 1471-2474
1471-2474
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Maria C. S. Inacio, Nicole L. Pratt, Elizabeth E. Roughead, Elizabeth W. Paxton and Stephen E. Graves
Abstract: Background: Pain is an indication for total hip arthroplasty (THA) and it should be resolved post-surgery. Because patients’ pain is typically treated pharmacologically we tested whether opioid use can be used as a surrogate for patient-reported pain and as an indicator for early surgical failure. Specifically, we evaluated whether the amount of opioids taken within the year after THA was associated with one and five years risk of revision surgery. Methods: A cohort of 9943 THAs (01/2001-12/2012) was evaluated. Post-operative opioid use was the exposure of interest and cumulative daily oral morphine equivalent (OME) amounts were calculated. Total OMEs/90-day periods were categorised into quartiles. Revisions within one and five years were the outcomes of interest. Results: Of the THAs, 2.0 % (N = 200) were revised within one year and 4.2 % (N = 413) within five years. After adjustments for gender, age, surgical indication, co-morbidities, and other analgesics, revision was associated with amount of OMEs in the second quarter after THA (days 91–180 after discharge). Patients on medium-high amounts of OME (400-1119 mg) had higher risk of one (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.22, 95 % CI 1.08-4.56) and five year (HR = 1.66, 95 % CI 1.08-2.56) revision than a patient not taking opioids. During the same period, patients taking the highest amounts of OMEs (≥1120 mg) had a 2.64 (95 % CI 1.03-6.74) times higher risk of one year and a 2.11 (95 % CI 1.13-3.96) times higher risk of five year revision. Conclusions: Opioid use 91–180 days post-surgery is associated with higher risk of revision surgery and therefore is an early and useful indicator for surgical failure.
Keywords: Opioids; total hip arthroplasty; revision; analgesic drugs
Rights: © Inacio et al. 2016. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
RMID: 0030112138
DOI: 10.1186/s12891-016-0970-6
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1040938
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1035889
Appears in Collections:Opthalmology & Visual Sciences publications

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
hdl_118877.pdfPublished version799.18 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.