Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/119890
Type: Thesis
Title: Hydraulic flow zones and reservoir characterisation
Author: Hoang, Tuan Gia
Issue Date: 2018
School/Discipline: Australian School of Petroleum
Abstract: Reservoir Characterisation is a more recently introduced discipline in petroleum technology and deals with static modelling of reservoirs. The discipline is a combination of traditional disciplines, namely geophysics, geology, petrophysics, and reservoir engineering. The research presented focuses on the use of Hydraulic Flow Zone Units (HFZUs), reservoir quality relationships derived from Routine Core Analysis (RCA) laboratory data. Such relationships are then typically incorporated into defining optimal functions for dynamic reservoir simulation based on Special Core Analysis (SCAL), where the overall purpose is the detailed study of reservoir performance. The thesis is aimed at covering optimal methods for correcting RCA laboratory measurements, zonating geological formations and analysing SCAL data. Comparisons between the proposed approaches and other well-known methodologies are included in this thesis. In terms of practical application, research presented includes conceptual reservoir simulation studies, showing the difference in results from traditional methodologies.A comprehensive approach is presented using HFZUs, the Modified Carman-Kozeny Purcell (MCKP) capillary pressure model (Goda and Behrenbruch, 2011) and the 2-phase Modified Carman-Kozeny (2pMCK) relative permeability model (Behrenbruch and Goda, 2006).
Advisor: Behrenbruch, Peter
Zeinijahromi, Abbas
Dissertation Note: Thesis (MPhil.) -- University of Adelaide, Australian School of Petroleum, 2019
Keywords: Hydraulic Flow zones
reservoir characterisation
routine core analysis
special core analysis
dynamic reservoir simulation
Provenance: This electronic version is made publicly available by the University of Adelaide in accordance with its open access policy for student theses. Copyright in this thesis remains with the author. This thesis may incorporate third party material which has been used by the author pursuant to Fair Dealing exceptions. If you are the owner of any included third party copyright material you wish to be removed from this electronic version, please complete the take down form located at: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/legals
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