Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/120150
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Type: Journal article
Title: Quantifying lead time bias when estimating patient survival in pre-emptive living kidney donor transplantation
Author: Irish, G.L.
Chadban, S.
McDonald, S.
Clayton, P.A.
Citation: American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, 2019; 19(12):3367-3376
Publisher: Wiley
Issue Date: 2019
ISSN: 1600-6135
1600-6143
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Georgina L. Irish, Steve Chadban, Stephen McDonald, Philip A. Clayton
Abstract: Pre-emptive kidney transplantation is the preferred initial renal replacement therapy, by avoiding dialysis and reportedly maximizing patient survival. Lead time bias may account for some or all of the observed survival advantage, but the impact of this has not been quantified. Using the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant (ANZDATA) Registry, we included adult recipients of living donor kidney transplants over 1998-2017. Patients were transplanted pre-emptively (n=1435) or after receiving up to 6 months of dialysis (n=712). We created a matched cohort using propensity scores, and accounted for lead time (dialysis and estimated pre-dialysis) using left-truncated Cox models with the primary outcome of patient survival. The median eGFR at transplantation was 6.9 mL/min/1.73m2 in the non pre-emptive, and 9.6 mL/min/1.73m2 in the pre-emptive group. In the matched cohort (n=1398) pre-emptive transplantation was not associated with a survival advantage ((hazard ratio (HR) for pre-emptive vs. non pre-emptive 1.12 (95% CI 0.79-1.61)). Accounting for lead time, moved the point estimates towards a survival disadvantage for pre-emptive transplantation (eg. HR assuming 4mL/min/1.732 /year eGFR decline, 1.21 (0.85,1.73)), but in all cases the 95% CIs crossed 1. The optimal timing of pre-emptive living donor kidney transplantation requires further study.
Keywords: clinical research/practice; donors and donation: living; epidemiology; kidney transplantation/nephrology; kidney transplantation: living donor; patient survival
Rights: © 2019 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons
RMID: 0030117384
DOI: 10.1111/ajt.15472
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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