Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/124784
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Type: Journal article
Title: Linking energy budget to physiological adaptation: how a calcifying gastropod adjusts or succumbs to ocean acidification and warming
Author: Leung, J.Y.
Russell, B.D.
Connell, S.D.
Citation: Science of the Total Environment, 2020; 715:136939-1-136939-8
Publisher: Elsevier
Issue Date: 2020
ISSN: 0048-9697
1879-1026
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Jonathan Y.S.Leung, Bayden D.Russell, Sean D.Connell
Abstract: Accelerating CO2 emissions have driven physico-chemical changes in the world's oceans, such as ocean acidification and warming. How marine organisms adjust or succumb to such environmental changes may be determined by their ability to balance energy intake against expenditure (i.e. energy budget) as energy supports physiological functions, including those with adaptive value. Here, we examined whether energy budget is a driver of physiological adaptability of marine calcifiers to the near-future ocean acidification and warming; i.e. how physiological energetics (respiration rate, feeding rate, energy assimilation and energy budget) relates to adjustments in shell growth and shell properties of a calcifying gastropod (Austrocochlea concamerata). We found that ocean warming boosted the energy budget of gastropods due to increased feeding rate, resulting in faster shell growth and greater shell strength (i.e. more mechanically resilient). When combined with ocean acidification, however, the gastropods had a substantial decrease in energy budget due to reduced feeding rate and energy assimilation, leading to the reduction in shell growth and shell strength. By linking energy budget to the adjustability of shell building, we revealed that energy availability can be critical to determine the physiological adaptability of marine calcifiers to the changing oceanic climate.
Keywords: Adaptation; Calcification; Gastropod; Ocean acidification; Ocean warming; Physiology
Rights: © 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
RMID: 1000013948
DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.136939
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP150104263
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT0991953
Appears in Collections:Environment Institute publications

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