Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/124830
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Type: Journal article
Title: Maternal periconceptional and first trimester protein restriction in beef heifers: effects on placental parameters and fetal and neonatal calf development
Author: Copping, K.J.
Hernandez-Medrano, J.
Hoare, A.
Hummitzsch, K.
McMillen, I.C.
Morrison, J.
Rodgers, R.
Perry, V.
Citation: Reproduction, Fertility and Development, 2020; 32(5):495-507
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Issue Date: 2020
ISSN: 1031-3613
1448-5990
Statement of
Responsibility: 
K. J. Copping, K. Hummitzsch, I. C. McMillen, J. L. Morrison, R. J. Rodgers and V. E. A. Perry ... et al.
Abstract: Few studies have investigated the effects of nutrition during the periconception and early gestation periods on fetal and placental development in cattle. In this study, nulliparous yearling heifers (n = 360) were individually fed a diet high or low in protein (HPeri and LPeri) beginning 60 days before conception. From 24 to 98 days after conception, half of each treatment group was changed to the alternative high- or low-protein diet (HPost and LPost) yielding four groups in a 2 × 2 factorial design. A subset of heifers (n = 46) was necropsied at 98 days after conception and fetoplacental development assessed. Placentome number and volume decreased in response to LPeri and LPost diets respectively. Absolute lung, pancreas, septum and ventricle weights decreased in LPost versus HPost fetuses, whereas the post-conception diet altered absolute and relative liver and brain weights depending on sex. Similarly, changes in fetal hepatic gene expression of factors regulating growth, glucose output and lipid metabolism were induced by protein restriction in a sex-specific manner. At term, neonatal calf and placental measures were not different. Protein restriction of heifers during the periconception and early gestation periods alters fetoplacental development and hepatic gene expression. These changes may contribute to functional consequences for progeny, but this may not be apparent from gross morphometry at birth.
Keywords: Beef cattle; fetal programming
Rights: Journal Compilation © CSIRO 2020 Open Access CC BY-NC-ND.
RMID: 1000014988
DOI: 10.1071/RD19017
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP110100649
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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