Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/126493
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Type: Journal article
Title: Joint elasticity effect on the failure behaviours of rock masses using a discrete element model
Author: Yuan, Y.
Zhou, C.
Wang, Z.
Du, J.
Citation: Energies, 2018; 11(11):2968-1-2968-14
Publisher: MDPI
Issue Date: 2018
ISSN: 1996-1073
1996-1073
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Yong Yuan, Changtai Zhou, Zhihe Wang and Jifang Du
Abstract: It is widely accepted that the mechanical properties and failure behaviours of a rock mass are largely dependent upon the geometrical and mechanical properties of discontinuities. The effect of joint elasticity on the failure behaviours of rock masses is investigated using a discrete element model, namely, the synthetic rock mass model. Here, uniaxial compression tests of the numerical model are carried out for the rock mass model with a persistent joint to analyse the role of joint elasticity in the failure process with various joint orientations, β. A strong correlation between the joint elasticity and failure strength is found from the simulation results: a positive relationship when the joint orientation β<φj; a negative relationship when the joint orientation φj<β<90∘ ; and a very limited effect when the joint orientation β=90∘ . Additionally, it is shown that the joint elasticity is the governing factor in the transition of failure modes, especially from the sliding failure mode along the joint to the mixed sliding-tensile failure mode.
Keywords: Anisotropy; discrete element model; joint stiffness; Jaeger’s criterion
Rights: © 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
RMID: 0030105455
DOI: 10.3390/en11112968
Appears in Collections:Civil and Environmental Engineering publications

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