Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/128318
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Type: Journal article
Title: Are the nutrient and textural properties of Australian commercial infant and toddler foods consistent with infant feeding advice?
Author: Moumin, N.A.
Green, T.J.
Golley, R.K.
Netting, M.J.
Citation: The British journal of nutrition, 2020; 124(7):754-760
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Issue Date: 2020
ISSN: 0007-1145
1475-2662
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Najma A. Moumin, Tim J. Green, Rebecca K. Golley and Merryn J. Netting
Abstract: Infant Feeding Guidelines worldwide recommend first foods be iron rich with no added sugars and that nutrient poor discretionary foods be avoided. Feeding guidelines also recommend exposing infants to a variety of foods and flavours with increasingly complex textures. Here, we compare nutritional and textural properties of commercial infant and toddler foods available in Australia with established infant feeding guidelines. Nutrition information and ingredient lists were obtained from food labels, manufacturer and/or retailer websites. In total, 414 foods were identified, comprising mostly mixed main dishes, fruit and vegetable first foods, and snacks. Most products were poor sources of iron, and 80% of first foods were fruit-based. Half of all products were purees in squeeze pouches and one third of all products were discretionary foods. The nutritional content of many products was inconsistent with guidelines, being low in iron, sweet, smooth in consistency, or classified as discretionary. Reformulation of products is warranted to improve iron content, particularly in mixed main dishes, expand the range of vegetable only foods, and textural variety. Greater regulatory oversight may be needed to better inform parents and caregivers. Frequent consumption of commercial baby foods low in iron may increase risk of iron deficiency. Excessive consumption of purees via squeeze pouches may also have implications for overweight and obesity risk.
Keywords: Commercial Complementary Foods; Infant Foods; Nutrient and Textural Properties; Toddler Foods
Rights: © The Author(s), 2020
RMID: 1000020974
DOI: 10.1017/s0007114520001695
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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