Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/128415
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Type: Journal article
Title: Ultrathin monolithic 3D printed optical coherence tomography endoscopy for preclinical and clinical use
Author: Li, J.
Thiele, S.
Quirk, B.C.
Kirk, R.W.
Verjans, J.W.
Akers, E.
Bursill, C.A.
Nicholls, S.J.
Herkommer, A.M.
Giessen, H.
McLaughlin, R.A.
Citation: Light: Science and Applications, 2020; 9(1):1-10
Publisher: Springer Nature
Issue Date: 2020
ISSN: 2047-7538
2047-7538
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Jiawen Li, Simon Thiele, Bryden C. Quirk, Rodney W. Kirk, Johan W. Verjans, Emma Akers ... et al.
Abstract: Preclinical and clinical diagnostics increasingly rely on techniques to visualize internal organs at high resolution via endoscopes. Miniaturized endoscopic probes are necessary for imaging small luminal or delicate organs without causing trauma to tissue. However, current fabrication methods limit the imaging performance of highly miniaturized probes, restricting their widespread application. To overcome this limitation, we developed a novel ultrathin probe fabrication technique that utilizes 3D microprinting to reliably create side-facing freeform micro-optics (<130 µm diameter) on single-mode fibers. Using this technique, we built a fully functional ultrathin aberration-corrected optical coherence tomography probe. This is the smallest freeform 3D imaging probe yet reported, with a diameter of 0.457 mm, including the catheter sheath. We demonstrated image quality and mechanical flexibility by imaging atherosclerotic human and mouse arteries. The ability to provide microstructural information with the smallest optical coherence tomography catheter opens a gateway for novel minimally invasive applications in disease.
Keywords: Biophotonics; Imaging and sensing; Micro-optics
Rights: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any mediumor format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changesweremade. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
RMID: 1000023875
DOI: 10.1038/s41377-020-00365-w
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/CE140100003
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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