Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/128701
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Type: Journal article
Title: A pH-neutral electrolyzed oxidizing water significantly reduces microbial contamination of fresh spinach leaves
Author: Ogunniyi, A.D.
Tenzin, S.
Ferro, S.
Venter, H.
Pi, H.
Amorico, T.
Deo, P.
Trott, D.J.
Citation: Food Microbiology, 2021; 93:1-9
Publisher: Elsevier
Issue Date: 2021
ISSN: 0740-0020
1095-9998
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Abiodun D. Ogunniyi, Sangay Tenzin, Sergio Ferro, Henrietta Venter, Hongfei Pi, Tony Amorico ... et al.
Abstract: There are growing demands globally to use safe, efficacious and environmentally friendly sanitizers for post- harvest treatment of fresh produce to reduce or eliminate spoilage and foodborne pathogens. Here, we compared the efficacy of a pH-neutral electrolyzed oxidizing water (Ecas4 Anolyte; ECAS) with that of an approved peroxyacetic acid-based sanitizer (Ecolab Tsunami® 100) in reducing the total microbial load and inoculated Escherichia coli, Salmonella Enteritidis and Listeria innocua populations on post-harvest baby spinach leaves over 10 days. The impact of both sanitizers on the overall quality of the spinach leaves during storage was also assessed by shelf life and vitamin C content measurements. ECAS at 50 ppm and 85 ppm significantly reduced the bacterial load compared to tap water-treated or untreated (control) leaves, and at similar levels (approx. 10-fold reduction) to those achieved using 50 ppm of Ecolab Tsunami® 100. While there were no obvious deleterious effects of treatment with 50 ppm Tsunami® 100 or ECAS at 50 ppm and 85 ppm on plant leaf appearance, tap water-treated and untreated leaves showed some yellowing, bruising and sliming. Given its safety, efficacy and environmentally-friendly characteristics, ECAS could be a viable alternative to chemical- based sanitizers for post-harvest treatment of fresh produce.
Keywords: Food safety; electrolyzed oxidizing water; peroxyacetic acid; post-harvest sanitization; baby spinach; foodborne pathogens
Rights: © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
RMID: 1000025278
DOI: 10.1016/j.fm.2020.103614
Appears in Collections:Agriculture, Food and Wine publications

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