Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/130267
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Type: Journal article
Title: Association between a hospital's quality performance for in-hospital cardiac arrest and common medical conditions
Author: Chen, L.M.
Nallamothu, B.K.
Krumholz, H.M.
Spertus, J.A.
Tang, F.
Chan, P.S.
Citation: Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, 2013; 6(6):700-707
Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Issue Date: 2013
ISSN: 1941-7713
1941-7705
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Lena M. Chen, Brahmajee K. Nallamothu, Harlan M. Krumholz, John A. Spertus, Fengming Tang and Paul S. Chan and for the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation Investigators
Abstract: Public reporting on hospital quality has been widely adopted for common medical conditions. Adding a measure of inpatient survival after cardiac arrest is being considered. It is unknown whether this measure would be redundant, given evidence that hospital organization and culture can have hospital-wide effects on quality. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the correlation between inpatient survival after cardiac arrest and 30-day risk-standardized mortality rates for common medical conditions.Using data between 2007 and 2010 from a national in-hospital cardiac arrest registry, we calculated risk-standardized in-hospital survival rates for cardiac arrest at each hospital. We obtained risk-standardized 30-day mortality rates for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia from Hospital Compare for the same period. The relationship between a hospital's performance on cardiac arrest and these other medical conditions was assessed using weighted Pearson correlation coefficients. Among 26 270 patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest at 130 hospitals, survival rates varied across hospitals, with a median risk-standardized hospital survival rate of 22.1% and an interquartile range of 19.7% to 24.2%. There were no significant correlations between a hospital's outcomes for its cardiac arrest patients and its patients admitted for acute myocardial infarction (correlation, -0.12; P=0.16), heart failure (correlation, -0.05; P=0.57), or pneumonia (correlation, -0.15; P=0.10).Hospitals that performed better on publicly reported outcomes for 3 common medical conditions did not necessarily have better cardiac arrest survival rates. Public reporting on cardiac arrest outcomes could provide new information about hospital quality.
Keywords: heart failure; myocardial infarction; resuscitation
Rights: © 2013 American Heart Association, Inc.
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCOUTCOMES.113.000377
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