Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/131065
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Type: Journal article
Title: Mapping inequalities in exclusive breastfeeding in low- and middle-income countries, 2000-2018
Author: Bhattacharjee, N.V.
Schaeffer, L.E.
Bhandari, D.
Hay, S.I.
Local Burden of Disease Exclusive Breastfeeding Collaborators
Citation: Nature Human Behaviour, 2021
Publisher: Springer Nature
Issue Date: 2021
ISSN: 2397-3374
2397-3374
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Natalia V. Bhattacharjee, Lauren E. Schaeffer, Simon I. Hay and Local Burden of Disease Exclusive Breastfeeding Collaborators
Abstract: Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF)—giving infants only breast-milk for the first 6 months of life—is a component of optimal breastfeeding practices effective in preventing child morbidity and mortality. EBF practices are known to vary by population and comparable subnational estimates of prevalence and progress across low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are required for planning policy and interventions. Here we present a geospatial analysis of EBF prevalence estimates from 2000 to 2018 across 94 LMICs mapped to policy-relevant administrative units (for example, districts), quantify subnational inequalities and their changes over time, and estimate probabilities of meeting the World Health Organization’s Global Nutrition Target (WHO GNT) of ≥70% EBF prevalence by 2030. While six LMICs are projected to meet the WHO GNT of ≥70% EBF prevalence at a national scale, only three are predicted to meet the target in all their district-level units by 2030.
Description: OnlinePubl
Rights: © The Author(s) 2021. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons. org/licenses/by/4.0/.
RMID: 1000042157
DOI: 10.1038/s41562-021-01108-6
Published version: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41562-021-01108-6
Appears in Collections:Public Health publications

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