Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/131425
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Type: Journal article
Title: Cross-national comparisons of the prevalence of gambling, problem gambling in young people and the role of accessibility in higher risk gambling: a study of Australia, Canada, Croatia and Israel
Author: Gavriel-Fried, B.
Delfabbro, P.
Ricijas, N.
Dodig Hundric, D.
Derevensky, J.L.
Citation: Current Psychology: developmental - learning - personality - social, 2021; 1-12
Publisher: Springer
Issue Date: 2021
ISSN: 1046-1310
1936-4733
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Belle Gavriel-Fried, Paul Delfabbro, Neven Ricijas, Dora Dodig Hundric and Jeffrey L. Derevensky
Abstract: Countries with public policies that support gambling through gambling legislation foster an environment in which gambling is socially accepted, tacitly encouraged and actively promoted. Although gambling worldwide has features in common, countries differ in terms of the nature of their gamblingmarkets. The current study examined the role of perceived gambling accessibility in gambling behaviors and problem gambling in four different countries: Australia, Canada, Croatia and Israel. A convenience sample comprised 1787 university students aged 18–30. Gambling behaviors and problems were found to be more prevalent and gambling was perceived to be more accessible in liberalized markets (e.g. Australia, Canada and Croatia) as compared to Israel which is relativelymore conservative and hasmore restrictive regulations. Social accessibility was perceived to be higher in those who gambled and associatedwith higher risk gambling, especially for women. The study highlights the potentially important role of social normalization of gambling and how supply variations can influence perceptions as well as impact gambling behavior.
Keywords: Accessibility; gambling behaviors; liberal gamblingmarkets
Description: Published: 02 July 2021 OnlinePubl
Rights: © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2021
DOI: 10.1007/s12144-021-02017-7
Grant ID: NHMRC
ARC
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