Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/131687
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Type: Journal article
Title: Sleep arousal burden is associated with long-term all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in 8001 community-dwelling older men and women
Author: Shahrbabaki, S.S.
Linz, D.
Hartmann, S.
Redline, S.
Baumert, M.
Citation: European Heart Journal, 2021; 42(21):2088-2099
Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)
Issue Date: 2021
ISSN: 0195-668X
1522-9645
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Sobhan Salari Shahrbabaki, Dominik Linz, Simon Hartmann, Susan Redline and Mathias Baumert
Abstract: Aims: To quantify the arousal burden (AB) across large cohort studies and determine its association with long-term cardiovascular (CV) and overall mortality in men and women. Methods and results: We measured the AB on overnight polysomnograms of 2782 men in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (MrOS) Sleep study, 424 women in the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF) and 2221 men and 2574 women in the Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS). During 11.2 ± 2.1 years of follow-up in MrOS, 665 men died, including 236 CV deaths. During 6.4 ± 1.6 years of follow-up in SOF, 105 women died, including 47 CV deaths. During 10.7 ± 3.1 years of follow-up in SHHS, 987 participants died, including 344 CV deaths. In women, multivariable Cox proportional hazard analysis adjusted for common confounders demonstrated that AB is associated with all-cause mortality [SOF: hazard ratio (HR) 1.58 (1.01–2.42), P = 0.038; SHHS-women: HR 1.21 (1.06–1.42), P = 0.012] and CV mortality [SOF: HR 2.17 (1.04–4.50), P = 0.037; SHHS-women: HR 1.60 (1.12–2.28), P = 0.009]. In men, the association between AB and all-cause mortality [MrOS: HR 1.11 (0.94–1.32), P = 0.261; SHHS-men: HR 1.31 (1.06–1.62), P = 0.011] and CV mortality [MrOS: HR 1.35 (1.02–1.79), P = 0.034; SHHS-men: HR 1.24 (0.86–1.79), P = 0.271] was less clear. Conclusions: Nocturnal AB is associated with long-term CV and all-cause mortality in women and to a lesser extent in men.
Keywords: Cardiovascular diseases
Rights: Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author(s) 2021. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
DOI: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehab151
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP0663345
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