Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/131852
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Field testing of vintage masonry: Mechanical properties and anchorage strengths
Author: Burton, C.
Visintin, P.
Griffith, M.
Vaculik, J.
Citation: Structures, 2020; 28:1900-1914
Publisher: Elsevier
Issue Date: 2020
ISSN: 2352-0124
2352-0124
Statement of
Responsibility: 
C. Burton, P. Visintin, M. Griffith, J. Vaculik
Abstract: Investigations of damage sustained following the 2010–2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence highlighted premature failure of anchorages in previously strengthened masonry. These failures suggest that a lack of understanding surrounding anchorage design is limiting the ability to seismically retrofit masonry structures. In order to provide experimental observations for use in developing and calibrating anchorage models a series of in-situ tests have been undertaken on three masonry structures to quantify in-situ mechanical properties and corresponding anchor pull-out loads and failure modes. Importantly, the outcomes of this field testing show poor correlation with the outcomes predicted by current design standards and approaches – that is, that the failure of anchorages by splitting of the masonry units rather than cone/wedge type failure or masonry unit extraction was the predominant observation. Additionally, due to difficulties with common test procedures, interpretation of standardised tests such as the “shove” test and the bond wrench test have been difficult. Alternative material tests and statistical distributions are proposed and a new anchorage failure model is suggested.
Keywords: Masonry; mechanical properties; chemical anchor; masonry failure
Rights: © 2020 Institution of Structural Engineers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
DOI: 10.1016/j.istruc.2020.10.023
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP190100797
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 4
Civil and Environmental Engineering publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.