Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/14229
Type: Journal article
Title: Future immigration policy development in Australia and New Zealand
Author: Hugo, G.
Citation: New Zealand Population Review, 2004; 30(1&2):25-42
Publisher: Population Association of New Zealand
Issue Date: 2004
ISSN: 0111-199X
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Graeme Hugo
Abstract: Australia and New Zealand have had shared values with respect to international migration and enjoyed a special bilateral international migration relationship for a long period although it has become more restrictive in the last few years. This paper examines developments in the relationship over the last few years together with some impacts. It speculates about some possible future scenarios of competition and collaboration between the two countries in the immigration area in the context of a rapidly changing global economic, political and security situation. One scenario given particular attention is that of greater harmonization of policy and joint co-operative efforts in recognition of Australia and New Zealand in many respects constituting a single labour market and having many similar immigration goals. Such groupings of nations are emerging over the world, albeit slowly and with difficulty. There is a trend toward development of free trade areas (NAFTA), common labour markets (EU) and groups of countries with special migration arrangements. It may be that national goals of both New Zealand and Australia may be best met through a co-operative rather than the competitive model.
Keywords: Emigration and immigration; economic policy; labor market; customs unions
Description: © Population Association of New Zealand
RMID: 0020042357
Published version: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=anh&AN=18645516
Appears in Collections:Geography, Environment and Population publications
Australian Population and Migration Research Centre publications

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